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Medieval Cat Tarot
by Lawrence Teng and Gina Pace

Medieval Cat Tarot - King of Swords I wasn't sure what to expect of this deck, but what I honestly didn't expect was to be as wholly impressed as I am. The cats have not simply been dressed in Renaissance garb or put in tarot poses. They have been depicted to demonstrate precise meanings for the cards, with depth and accuracy. They are not overly cute; rather, they gaze out from the cards with often serious looks of contemplation, and expressiveness that is shown mostly in their eyes. Also, they are not all cat but somewhat human, with human shapes, and hands. One does not have to be a big cat lover to enjoy the deck - the cats as tarot figures are entirely convincing.

Though the illustrations are based largely on the Rider-Waite, the cards depend on their own imagery. And this they do very well. For example, in the Eight of Swords, a cat stares wide-eyed out from behind bars, which are further blocked by a chain and lock. A key dangles near the cat, though he doesn't notice it. A cat sits with arms crossed in front of his chest in the Four of Cups, three ignored cups before him, and a fourth cup being offered to him on a tray. His gaze is cast to the side. The miserliness of the Four of Coins is indicated in many locks on a cat's door. He holds a ring of keys, but the task of opening the door looks tedious. The sense of being overly cautious, protecting or guarding what one has, is obvious. The little booklet explains the card with good balance: "The Four of Coins shows where we feel threatened by what we have experienced in the past; our security is exercised in overkill because our perception of danger or struggle is much more than the reality. We may actually be safe, but we still feel intimidated. We must realize that our foundation has been laid securely and we may now build upon it." Another good example of this effective use of simple imagery is the Three of Wands, in which our cat holds a small ship in one hand, a telescope in the other. The text that interprets this card for us says, "The Three of Wands symbolizes the ability to see what it is that we are launching and to put it into motion. We carry with us the small tokens that remind us that we are responsible for putting our own ships out to sea if we wish to see our ships return overflowing with prosperity and abundance." The pictures are incredibly clear in meaning, but the artwork is purposeful, rich, and ornate. Interpretation and understanding are accessible, while the aesthetic experience is fully rewarding.

Medieval Cat Tarot - The Hanged Man The Majors are not numbered. The artist states simply, "Some of the first tarot decks did not include numerology symbols or a numbering system in the Major Arcana. I have chosen that same omission for Medieval Cat Tarot. As there is some interchangeability with a few of the Majors (most often Strength and Justice), this allows the reader to use the cards at his or her discretion." I will just note - for those who might be starting out - that this does not make using the cards any more difficult. A traditional ordering of the cards is presented in the booklet. Most of the Majors stick to expected imagery, though often with a whimsical or lighthearted air - The Hanged Man reminds me that cats always land upright from a fall, because the featured cat here does not exactly hang upside down as is standard - he looks ready to land safely if he falls. This seems to intend a hopeful aspect of a card that is sometimes misunderstood as frightening or ominous. The grim reaper in Death is surrounded by butterflies, which indicate personal metamorphosis. It is a purely positive element in what some believe is a difficult card. And the Devil is a fox hiding behind a cat's mask, and makes clear the meaning expressed in the booklet: "It is the Devil inside each of us that this card addresses. We are our own worst enemy - we bedevil ourselves at the times when we undermine our own best efforts to get clear of the repeating patterns of behavior and abuse in our lives. This Devil, for example, hides behind a mask, much as we hide behind our own denial when we fight ourselves on many levels."

Also notable in Medieval Cat Tarot, is the emphasis on the court cards to provide insight into the self, rather than to merely serve as representations of others. These are presented largely as a progression of the self, which stage one might be in, etc. The court cards can still represent another, but they are clearly described as phases in development, and in this way are quite helpful. An included spread, "The Court Cards Curve," is an aid in learning to see the court cards in this way.

Because of the simplicity in symbolism, the deck would be a super choice for someone just starting out. The accompanying booklet offers more than enough instruction on the meanings of each card, along with added insight and clear ideas for interpretation. It is a highly readable, very strong, and well-rounded deck, in image and word. My own readings with it have been highly useful and insightful. I recommend it for everyone - except perhaps, those who really don't like cats!

Medieval Cat Tarot - Ace of Pentacles Medieval Cat Tarot - The Popess Medieval Cat Tarot - Three of Wands


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Card artwork by Lawrence Teng







All writing and photography © N Levine - Illumination Tarot, unless otherwise noted. 1999-2019